P.I. Roofing

Roofing Tips

Will a New Roof Increase My Home’s Value?

It’s decided: You’ve done the math. You’ve checked out the school districts and you’re ready to move. And that means you need to put your house on the market. Selling your home can be stressful, and making the right decisions regarding updates and staging are crucial to getting top dollar for your house. Certain projects, like redoing your kitchen, are almost guaranteed to significantly increase your final sale price, while others are more of a gamble – like roof work. So, will replacing your roof or doing extensive repairs really pay off when selling your home? Yes and no. Let us explain…
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P.I. Maintenance Plan: A Gym Membership For Your Home

Spring has sprung and summer is quickly approaching. It’s a time where most people are thinking of shedding some of that winter weight and heavily considering a gym membership. The commercials are all over the radio; gyms offering a package deal of weights and trainers and classes to achieve the results you’re looking for. What we often forget is that our home needs a similar type of attention after seasonal storms. Winter and spring might have dumped some extra weight on your roof and gutters. Consider a membership plan to help get your home in tip-top shape. And not just for the summer months, but all year long.
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The Misconceptions Of Roof Penetrations

It is understandable that people hate roof penetrations and try to avoid them at all cost. A commercial roofing system is expensive and the thought of poking holes in it sends shivers down one’s spine. But instead of simply avoiding roof penetrations altogether, consider that if done properly, those painful leaks can be eliminated and rooftop equipment can be mounted securely.
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Intake vs. Exhaust Ventilation

The basic idea of ventilation is to allow your roof and attic to breath. Similar to the needs of your own body, your roof also needs air to come into the attic and then go out to circulate the air and moisture in the attic.

Intake ventilation is classified as non-piercing ventilation – and is provided by gable or soffit vents. Gable vents are on the side of your house, usually under a peek, or gable, in the roof. Soffit vents are in the underside of your eaves, in the part of the roof that’s parallel to the ground. These vents help increase circulation in the attic to let your roof breathe.

Exhaust ventilation for your roof may pierce the roof or be in the walls under the roof or under the eaves. You may have ridge vents providing ventilation for your roof. These vents run the length of your roof peak, and have weather filters and baffles in them. They work with soffit vents to allow air to circulation. The other common types of exhaust ventilation is turbines, also known as whirly birds. Turbines may be wind-powered, solar powered or powered by electricity. Some come equipped with thermostats and even with a humidistat control to accommodate attic humidity levels. All these require flashing. It is important not to mix ventilation products but rather to use the right products for each situation. Ventilation is not a “one product fits all” solution, where you can just add any product, regardless of what your existing system is, and see a benefit.

Not sure if your roof is getting the right ventilation? Let us come out and provide a free roof inspection.